In Brief

New Degree in Infectious Disease and Global Health

Cummings School will offer a new degree program to prepare graduates for careers in research, academia, government, biopharma and nonprofits
January 13, 2015

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In response to emerging threats from infectious disease such as the ongoing Ebola outbreak, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine will offer a new degree program to prepare graduates for careers in research, academia, government, biopharma and nonprofits. All have a growing need for expertise in global health issues.

Applications are being accepted for the new M.S. in infectious disease and global health. The 12-month program begins in fall 2015.

An estimated six out of 10 infectious diseases in people originate in animals, says Saul Tzipori, chair of Cummings School’s Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health. “The future will likely witness more frequent outbreaks of new infectious diseases—and ones that are more virulent than what we’ve seen in the past,” he predicts. “Many factors will contribute to this phenomenon, including the exponential growth in human and domestic animal populations, shrinking wildlife habitats and international travel.”

The program will be taught by Cummings School faculty who have expertise in infectious disease, global and public health and conservation and wildlife medicine. Working in the laboratory and in the field, students will learn about diagnostic and investigative tools and current approaches for the treatment, control and prevention of infectious diseases—including zoonotic diseases, or those that can be transmitted from animals to humans.

“The risk of disease spillover from wildlife to domestic animals and humans is a serious public health crisis,” Tzipori says. “Threats such as Ebola, avian flu and MERS have become a major focus for research institutions and for disease surveillance, investigation and control by governments and international agencies. Our graduates will be well prepared to help meet the demand for professionals trained to address these and other evolving threats to human health.”

For more information, visit the program website.