People Notes

People Notes September 2015

ARTS, SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING TENURE AND PROMOTIONS

Laurie Baise has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Clay Bennett has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Chemistry.

Amahl Bishara has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Anthropology.

Bárbara Brizuela has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Education.

Luisa Chiesa has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Erik Dopman has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Biology.

Moon Duchin has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Mathematics.

Brian Epstein has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Philosophy.

Ioannis Evrigenis has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Political Science.

Catherine Freudenreich has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Biology.

Soha Hassoun has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Computer Science.

Joshua Kritzer has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Chemistry.

Daniel Kuchma has been awarded tenure at the rank of professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Peter Love has been awarded tenure at the rank of associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Danilo Marchesini has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Melissa McInerney has been awarded tenure at the rank of associate professor in the Department of Economics.

Margaret McMillan has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Economics.

Pedro Palou has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Romance Languages.

Matt Panzer has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering.

Ani Patel has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of Psychology.

Jianmin Qu, the new dean of the School of Engineering, has been awarded tenure at the rank of professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and has been named the Karol Family Professor in the department of Mechanical Engineering.

Alisha Rankin has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of History.

Hugh Roberts has been promoted to the rank of professor in the Department of History.

Pablo Ruiz has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Romance Languages.

Cristian Staii has been awarded tenure and promoted to the rank of associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Sigrun Svavarsdottir has been awarded tenure at the rank of associate professor in the Department of Philosophy.

Malcolm Turvey has been awarded tenure at the rank of professor in the Department of Art and Art History.

 

NEW FACULTY IN ARTS, SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING: PART 1

(Part 2 will appear in the October People Notes)

Rachel Applebaum joined Tufts this fall as an assistant professor in the Department of History. She received a Ph.D. in modern Russian and Eastern European history from the University of Chicago, an M.A. in Russian and East European studies from the University of Toronto and a B.A. in history and Russian literature from McGill University. Her doctoral dissertation is titled Friendship of the Peoples: Soviet-Czechoslovak Cultural and Social Contacts from the Battle for Prague to the Prague Spring, 1945-1969. Applebaum specializes in assessing and understanding Soviet hegemony in Eastern Europe following World War II. In 2014-15, these studies earned her a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Center for the Humanities at Tufts, where she taught the course “The Soviet Union: From International Revolution to Global Power.” Prior to that, she was a Max Weber Postdoctoral Fellow at the European University Institute in Italy and a visiting assistant professor of modern European history at Lafayette College. She is working on a book project, Empire of Friends: Soviet Power and Socialist Internationalism in Czechoslovakia, 1945-1989. She has also published articles on Soviet-Czech relations in Slavic Review and in the book The Socialist Sixties: Crossing Borders in the Second World. She has given presentations on Soviet history at conferences, workshops and seminars, including talks at the University of Geneva, the University of Lausanne, Princeton University, the University of Illinois, Columbia University and the University of Chicago.

Mark Hempstead, E03, has returned to Tufts as an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He earned a Ph.D. and an M.S. in engineering sciences from Harvard University and a B.S. in computer engineering from Tufts. Prior to joining Tufts, Hempstead was the Junior Colehower Chair Assistant Professor at Drexel University, where he developed a research program in power-aware computer architecture, low-power circuit design and power-aware systems. He has also held positions as a postdoctoral research intern in the R&D department at ARM Ltd. in Cambridge, United Kingdom, and as a research assistant at Harvard. In 2014, Hempstead received the Drexel University Allen Rothwarf Award for Teaching Excellence, the Drexel College of Engineering Excellence in Research Award and an NSF CAREER award. His research projects have included “Fast and Efficient Hardware Design Exploration through Memory-No Analysis for Multi-Core SoCs,” funded by the Samsung GRO Program, and “CSR Medium: Collaborative Research: Architecture and System Support for Power-Agile Computing,” funded by the National Science Foundation. Hempstead was the keynote speaker at the International Conference on Computer Design in 2013, when he gave a presentation titled “Combating Dark Silicon: It Takes a Village.” He has given talks and presentations at Swarthmore, Princeton, Washington University and Columbia.

Mark Hertzberg comes to Tufts this September as an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received a Ph.D. in physics from MIT and an M.S. in physics and a B.S. in physics and mathematics from the University of Sydney. His doctoral thesis is titled Inflationary Cosmology and Fundamental Physics, related to his specialization in theoretical cosmology. Hertzberg was a postdoctoral fellow at MIT from 2012 to 2014 and a postdoctoral research fellow at the Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology from 2010 to 2012. He received several honors for his undergraduate studies, including the University Medal in Physics, the NSW AIP Prize in Physics and the Deas-Thomson Scholarship in Senior Physics. Hertzberg has given numerous research talks, including nine presentations in 2014 alone on topics such as “Some Aspects of Modified Gravity” at the MIT/Tufts Cosmology Seminar, “Large Scale Structure, Baryons and Dark Matter” at the Arizona State University cosmology seminar and “Baryogenesis from the Inflation Field” at the COSMO Conference at the University of Chicago.

Xiaocheng Jiang is a new assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. He earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Harvard University and a B.S. in chemistry from Peking University in Beijing, China. Before coming to Tufts, he was a research fellow at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, where he researched microfluidics for cell sorting and analysis. He was also a research fellow and research assistant in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard, where he established a measurement platform for single-cell-level electrochemical characterization of exoelectrogenic bacteria. In 2014, Jiang received an American Cancer Society Postdoctoral Fellowship. He also received a Distinction in Teaching Award from Harvard in 2005 and the Fieser Graduate Research Fellowship in 2004. His research has been presented at numerous conferences and published in many scholarly journals, including the Journal of Physics and Chemistry, Crystal Growth and Design, Chemistry of Materials and Nano Letters. He is working on his latest manuscript, “Platelet-Targeted Microfluidic Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells.”

Jess Keiser, A06, returned to Tufts this fall as an assistant professor in the Department of English. Keiser received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in English literature from Cornell University and his B.A. in English literature magna cum laude from Tufts. He was an assistant professor of English at Washington and Lee University in 2014-15 and a visiting assistant professor at Baruch College, CUNY. Earlier, Keiser received a postdoctoral research fellowship at the Humanities Research Center at Rice University. He also won the Guilford Essay Prize from Cornell in 2013 for the dissertation that displayed the highest excellence in English prose. Keiser’s area of specialization is 18th-century English literature. Among his published articles are “Nervous Figures: Enlightenment Neurology and the Personified Mind” in ELH and “Very Like a Whale: Metaphor and Materialism in Hobbes and Swift” in Modern Philology. He is working on a book manuscript that redefines understanding of science and literature in the 18th century. Keiser has given papers at a number of conferences, the most recent of which include “New Materialism and Old Hobbyhorses” at Columbia University in 2014 and “Six Metaphors of Mind: Soldiers” at the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.

Mimi Kao came to Tufts this fall as an assistant professor in the Department of Biology. She earned a Ph.D. in neuroscience at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), an M.A. in regional studies focusing on East Asia at Harvard University and a B.A. human biology and East Asian studies at Stanford. She is a specialist in the field of optogenetics and has held research positions at the Center for Integrative Neuroscience, the Keck Center for Integrative Neuroscience and Harvard Medical School. In 2013, Kao received the Cozzarelli Prize in Biological Sciences from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. She also received the Postdoctoral Scholar Research Award from UCSF in 2009 and 2010, the Capranica Foundation Prize in Neuroethology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute predoctoral fellowship. Kao has been invited to speak at a number of conferences and educational institutions; her most recent talk, at Columbia University, was titled “Changing Your Tune: Neural Circuits for Motor Exploration and Plasticity.” She worked as a teaching assistant and a mentor supervising graduate students at the UCSF and has co-authored articles in the Journal of Neurophysiology, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, Nature and the Journal of Neuroscience.

Elizabeth Marfeo is a new assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy. She received a Ph.D. in health services research from Boston University, an M.P.H. in health policy from Yale University School of Public Health and a B.S. in occupational therapy from the Medical College of Georgia. Her doctoral dissertation is titled Examining Conceptual and Measurement Challenges in Mental Health-Related Work Disability. Marfeo’s most recent academic appointment was as a research assistant professor at Boston University School of Public Health and its Health & Disability Research Institute. She has been a guest lecturer in the rehabilitation sciences Ph.D. program at the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions. Her research interests include measurement development, work disability and healthy aging across the adult lifespan. Her primary research goals are focused on understanding the interactions between environmental demands, adaptations and aging as they affect a person’s health and quality of life, including work. Her interdisciplinary research specialization and clinical background as an occupational therapist allow her to bridge gaps between health services research and clinical applications of that research.

Ekaterina Mirkin has joined Tufts as a lecturer in the Department of Biology. She earned a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular genetics at the University of Illinois and an M.S. in molecular biology from Moscow State University, Russia. From 2006 to 2013, she was a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University, where she researched interactions in chromosomes of S. cerevisiae. Her research as a graduate student focused on the attenuation of DNA replication in E. coli. Mirkin has held positions as a guest lecturer, teaching assistant and head teaching assistant for life sciences at Harvard. In 2012, 2013 and 2014, she was awarded the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching for life sciences, and she received a National Institutes of Health NRSA Postdoctoral Fellowship. Mirkin’s work has been published in select academic journals. Her most recent article, published in Molecular Cell, is titled “To Switch or Not to Switch: At the Origin of Repeat Expansion Disease.”

Shameka Powell joined Tufts this fall as an assistant professor in the Department of Education. Powell earned a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and a M.Ed. and B.A. in secondary English education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Powell’s dissertation is titled Sifting for Success: A Grounded Theory Approach to Black Student Academic Success. Powell’s areas of specialization are racial stratification in school spaces, critical literacy studies and queer theories. While in Wisconsin, Powell was a guest lecturer on topics such as multicultural perspectives in education and was awarded the Tashia F. Morgridge Wisconsin Distinguished Graduate Fellowship, as well as an Asa G. Hilliard and Barbara A. Sizemore Research Institute on African-American Education fellowship from the American Educational Research Association. Prior to that, Powell was an instructor of journalism and media studies at Bennett College, an English instructor at UNC Greensboro and an English teacher for five years at an urban high school in North Carolina. Powell’s published work includes “‘It’s Not Them, It’s Me’: Competing Discourses in One Aspiring Teacher’s Talk” in Teaching Education and “‘What Does It Mean to Be the Pride of Pinesville’: Opportunities Facilitated and Constrained” in Educational Inequalities in School and Higher Education.

Elizabeth Race joined Tufts in September as an assistant professor of psychology in the School of Arts and Sciences. She received a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Stanford University and a B.S. in biology, with a minor in psychology, and a certificate in human development from Duke University. She was also a postdoctoral fellow at the Memory Disorders Research Center, run by Boston University and the VA Boston Healthcare System. Her doctoral dissertation is titled Integrating the Past and Present: Repetition-Related Learning and Cortical Plasticity in the Human Brain. Race specializes in the rapidly evolving field of cognitive neuroscience, with particular focus on the medial temporal lobe as it relates to memory. Her most recent teaching assignment was as an adjunct professor at the University of Colorado, where she taught two classes, Introduction to Psychology and Statistics and Research Methods. Previously, she was an adjunct professor at Colorado State University, where she taught the course Mind, Brain and Behavior. She has also served as a guest lecturer on learning, memory and amnesia at Boston University and held several teaching posts at Stanford, where her lecture topics included the use of magnetic resonance imaging and studying human memory with fMRI. Race has received a number of awards and fellowships, including the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award/Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship and the National Science Foundation’s graduate research fellowship. She is working on a manuscript with other researchers about how transcranial magnetic stimulation to the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex disrupts memory-guided decision making. She recently published “Sharing Mental Simulations and Stories: Hippocampal Contributions to Discourse Integration” in Cortex. She has presented at many conferences, including those sponsored by the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, the Social Affective Neuroscience Society, the International Neuropsychology Society and the Society for Neuroscience.

Nicholas Seaver has joined Tufts as an assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology. He received his master’s and doctoral degrees in sociocultural anthropology from the University of California, Irvine, an S.M. in comparative media studies from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in literature from Yale University. His doctoral dissertation is titled Computing Taste: The Making of Algorithmic Music Recommendation. While at UC Irvine, Seaver co-taught a graduate seminar titled “Latour: Metaphysics and Ecopolitics.” He has also worked as a researcher at the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing and the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion at UC Irvine. At Tufts, he will introduce the new field of the anthropology of science and technology. His recent publications include a chapter titled “Bastard Algebra” in Data, Now Bigger & Better, and “‘This is Not a Copy’: Mechanical Fidelity and the Re-enacting Piano” in a special issue of differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies. He has served as a peer reviewer for the journals Science as Culture and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. He has presented widely at conferences and annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Social Studies of Science. During the fall semester he will be working at Microsoft, where he has a fellowship.

Natalie Shapero joined Tufts this September as a professor of the practice in the English department. She has a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School, an M.F.A. in poetry from Ohio State University and a B.A. in writing seminars from Johns Hopkins University. Shapero is the author of a forthcoming book of poetry, No Object, and has had her poems appear in dozens of publications, including The New Yorker, POETRY, The New Republic, 32 Poems, The Literary Review and Poetry Northwest. Her work has also been published in numerous anthologies, including Montreal Prize 2013 Global Poetry Anthology and New Poetry from the Midwest. Shapero is editor-at-large of The Kenyon Review, where she previously served as associate editor. She has taught poetry at the Columbus College of Art and Design and has received numerous awards, including the Great Lakes College Association New Writers Award in 2014 and the Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation in 2013. She has been invited to give readings at many universities and events, including Denison University, Drexel University, Ball State University and the Big Big Mess Reading Series. She has given numerous talks and interviews, including a presentation at Kenyon College on “Law, Literature and the Limits of Appropriation,” which brought together her legal background and literary experience.

Alan Finkelstein Shapiro joined Tufts this fall as an assistant professor in the Department of Economics. He earned both a Ph.D. and an M.A. in economics from the University of Maryland and a B.A. in economics with distinction from Boston University. During his doctoral studies, he was awarded the Roger and Alicia Betancourt Fellowship in Applied Economics. His doctoral dissertation is titled The Business Cycle Consequences of Informal Labor Markets. He specializes in macroeconomics, with areas of interest that include labor economics, international macroeconomics and monetary economics. Prior to joining Tufts, Finkelstein Shapiro was an assistant professor of economics at the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. He has also taught at the University of Maryland and has served as a consultant for the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, D.C., where he received two IADB grants for studies of the labor markets in Latin America and the Caribbean. He recently published “Self-Employment and Business Cycle Persistence: Does the Composition of Employment Matter for Economic Recoveries?” in the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control.

Riccardo Strobino joins Tufts this fall as a Mellon assistant professor in the Department of Classics. He earned a Ph.D. in philosophy from Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa, an M.S. in economics from the Università “Bocconi” in Milan and an M.A. in philosophy from the Università degli Studi di Milano. His dissertation is titled Concedere, negare, dubitare: Peter of Mantua’s Treatise on Obligations, for which he was awarded the E. Bocca Prize by Scuola Normale Superiore and the University of Turin for the best Ph.D. dissertation of the year in philosophy. His areas of specialization include the history of logic, Arabic-Islamic philosophy, medieval philosophy and Avicenna. He is also interested in the studies of Aristotle and metaphysics. Prior to coming to Tufts, Strobino was a visiting lecturer at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he taught “Topics in Islamic Philosophy from al-Kindī to Averroes” and “Topics in Medieval Philosophy on Medieval Theories of Modalities.” He has been a research associate and lecturer at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Cambridge, Clare Hall College, part of an international project on Arabic logic and philosophy of language. Strobino has published numerous articles and book chapters. His most recent work includes “What Is Form All About: A 14th-Century Discussion of Logical Consequence” in Formal Approaches and Natural Language in the Middle Ages (Cesalli, Goubier and de Libera, eds.). He is the author of a forthcoming monograph titled The Scales of Logic: Avicenna’s Theory of Science and Relations in Medieval Philosophy, a collection of essays on the logic and metaphysics of relations in medieval thought. Strobino has given many presentations, including lectures at Harvard University, the University of Helsinki, the Warburg Institute and the University of Geneva.

Malcolm Turvey has joined Tufts as the Sol Gittleman Professor in the Department of Art and Art History and as co-director of the Film and Media Studies Program. Turvey earned a Ph.D. in cinema studies from New York University and M.A. and B.A. degrees in film studies from the University of Kent in Canterbury, England. Prior to coming to Tufts, he was a tenured professor in film history at Sarah Lawrence College and an adjunct professor in the Cinema Studies Department at New York University; he is an editor of the journal October. Turvey has taught courses on film aesthetics, the theory and philosophy of film, French cinema, experimental film, the horror film and storytelling in film and TV, and has written articles on these and other topics for a variety of journals and publications, including Cognitive Media Theory, October, Artforum, Projections: The Journal for Movies and Mind, Millennium Film Journal and European Film Theory. His most recent book is The Filming of Modern Life: European Avant-Garde Film of the 1920s (MIT Press, 2011). His first book, Doubting Vision: Film and the Revelationist Tradition, was published by Oxford University Press in 2008. He also co-edited the anthology Wittgenstein, Theory and the Arts (Routledge, 2001). He has given lectures and presentations at many academic institutions and organizations and has spoken at Johns Hopkins, Columbia and Duke, among others. In 2011, he was awarded the Stanford Humanities Center External Fellowship to begin work on his current book project, Jacques Tati and Comedic Modernism.

James Van Deventer joins Tufts this fall as an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering. He received a Ph.D. and an M.S. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology and a B.S. in chemical engineering from Stanford. Since 2011, he has been a postdoctoral fellow at the K. Dane Wittrup Laboratory in the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His work there has focused on developing anti-cancer therapies based on targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts and investigating their activities in mouse models of cancer. He has also explored enhancements to the protein engineering technique known as yeast display using noncanonical amino acids. Prior to that, he was a research assistant in the David A. Tirrell Laboratory in the chemical engineering department at the California Institute of Technology, where he engineered antibody fragments with noncanonical amino acids using flow cytometry and click chemistry. In 2013-14, Van Deventer was a substitute lecturer in experimental biology and communication at MIT. He has received a number of awards and fellowships, including the National Institutes of Health Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award and the Ludwig Foundation for Cancer Research Postdoctoral Fellowship. His article “A Switchable Yeast Display/Secretion System” has been accepted for publication later this year in Protein Engineering, Design and Selection.

Iryna Zenyuk joined Tufts this fall as an assistant professor of mechanical engineering. She comes to the university with a Ph.D. and an M.S. in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. She received her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of NYU. From 2009 to 2013, Zenyuk was a graduate research assistant at Carnegie Mellon, where she studied ion transport and reaction kinetics in fuel cell electrodes. From 2014-15 she was a postdoctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), where she worked on transport phenomena in fuel cells using synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and modeling. Her research expertise is in electrochemical energy conversion systems, material characterization and component diagnostics. She received best student poster awards at the 2013 Electrochemical Society Meeting, the 2012 Gordon Fuel Cells Research Conference and the 2010 Symposium of the International Association for Hydrogen Energy. She also received the Best Teaching Assistant Award for Outstanding Teaching in Mechanical Engineering, as voted by students at Carnegie Mellon. She has co-authored a number of articles published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Electrochimica Acta, Electrochemistry Communications and Journal of Electrochemical Society, among others. Zenyuk delivered invited talks at working group meetings organized by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Program in 2014 and 2015 and at the Electrochemistry Group Seminar at LBNL. She is scheduled to give an invited talk at the 228th Electrochemical Society meeting.

PEOPLE NOTES

Jeffrey Ashe, a research fellow at Tufts’ Global Development and Environment Institute, returned recently from the Dominican Republic, where he is helping design and evaluate a program that will include 200,000 of that country’s poorest inhabitants in savings groups. 

Miguel Basanez, an adjunct professor and director of the Judiciary Reform Program at the Fletcher School, has been nominated to be Mexico’s ambassador to the United States.

Alia Bucciarelli, an adjunct assistant professor at the School of Medicine, recently published the book Alzheimer’s Disease, which is available in paperback and as a Kindle e-book. Using a question-and-answer format, the book is designed to give caregivers, family members and friends of people with Alzheimer’s disease easy access to the practical information they need to understand the symptoms, its treatment and how to preserve quality of life. The book is one in a series for consumers on various health topics.

Lucia Foulkes is the new program coordinator for the LL.M. program at the Fletcher School. She earned a B.A. in international relations from Claremont, and last May she completed both an M.A. in higher education administration and a J.D. from Boston College. As an undergraduate student at Claremont, she spent three years working as a development assistant in the university’s advancement office. At Boston College, she was a research assistant in the Boston College Law School’s global initiatives program and assisted with the law school’s development of an LL.M. strategic plan. Her legal experience includes serving as an intern in the Boston offices of both the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and the U.S. Attorney’s Anti-Terrorism Unit. She also served as a law clerk in the Office of General Counsel for the Massachusetts Teachers Association.

Nick Frank, professor and chair of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, traveled to Calgary, Canada, July 16-17 to give six presentations on equine endocrinology at the annual Canadian Veterinary Medical Association meeting.

Siobhan Gallagher was promoted to deputy director of the Tufts Office of Public Relations for the health sciences campus in Boston on Sept. 1. Previously associate director, she has been instrumental in significantly increasing positive media coverage for Tufts research, teaching and clinical care, including prominent stories in influential media such as the New York Times and NBC Nightly News. Before coming to Tufts, Gallagher worked at a public relations agency for technology and health care, where her team helped the agency earn industry awards for strategic communications campaigns. She also ran her own public relations, marketing communications and research agency for eight years. Gallagher has an M.B.A. from Simmons College and a B.A. in literature cum laude from McGill University.

Josephine Herman, A13, is among the 55 individuals selected for a Princeton in Latin America (PiLA) Fellowship for 2015-16. PiLA is an independent nonprofit that offers yearlong post-undergraduate social justice service placements with its nonprofit and NGO partners in Latin America and the Caribbean. Herman will be working with Trócaire in Guatemala.

Alicia Karas, an assistant professor of clinical sciences at Cummings School, attended the Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association spring conference in Marlborough, Massachusetts, at which she presented several lectures: “The Current Pain Management Standard of Care--Pain, Anxiety, Dysphoria: How Do I Know What They Feel?”, “Preventing and Managing Acute Pain in Small Animal Patients: A Case-Based Workshop” and “Chronic Pain Case Management Workshop.”

Eileen Kennedy, professor of nutrition and former dean of the Friedman School, has been appointed to the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE), a 15-member science-policy group that provides independent analysis and advice to the Committee on World Food Security, part of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization.

Richard M. Lerner, the Bergstrom Chair in Applied Developmental Science and director of the Tufts Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development, has been named the 2015 recipient of the American Psychological Association Division 1 Ernest R. Hilgard Lifetime Achievement Award for distinguished contributions to general psychology. A professor in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development since 1999, Lerner has more than 700 scholarly publications, including more than 80 authored or edited books.

Nan Levinson, a lecturer in English, gave a presentation about antiwar activists in the U.S. military and their moral injury to the CONTACT Summer Peacebuilding Program at the School for International Training Graduate Institute in Vermont in June.

Sabrina McCarthy has been named unit manager for Tufts Dining’s Central Culinary Services. She brings 17 years of experience with Tufts Dining in a variety of roles, including in retail operations and catering. She helped to design and launch the No Name Café, Hotung Café and most recently, the Commons Marketplace.

Edward Morgan has been named associate director for learning assessment at the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT). He comes to CELT from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, where he was director of assessment. Morgan will focus on working with Tufts faculty members on the assessment of learning by developing an Institute for Learning Assessment as well as providing consultation and support to faculty members across all campuses. For his entire career, he has studied student outcome experiences in college and focused on increasing student learning. Morgan received a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Arizona and has worked in both teaching-focused and research-intensive institutions. He is secretary for the board of the New England Educational Assessment Network.

Kathleen “Katie” Mulroy joined the Fletcher School on Aug. 26 as the new associate director of student affairs. She recently completed a master’s degree in higher education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. After graduating summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa with a B.A. in international studies from the University of Richmond, she worked as a high school teacher in northern Japan under the auspices of the Japan Exchange and Teaching program. She then became a program coordinator, first at the Riken-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics and more recently at MIT’s Global Education and Career Development Center. In addition to her three years in Japan, Mulroy’s work at the Riken-MIT Center took her to Japan for two months every year.

Alexander Neale, V17, received a cash prize from the American Veterinary Medical History Society for his essay “In Sickness and in Health: A Marriage of Veterinary and Human Medicine, 1866-1881.”

Lindsay Philips, V14, has joined the Tufts Ambulatory Service (TAS) as a clinical veterinarian and lecturer. Philips had been assisting TAS on a temporary basis since October 2014.

Lorin Polidora has been named the manager of administrative services for the Collaborative Learning and Innovation Complex (CLIC), a new facility on Boston Avenue on the Medford/Somerville campus. Previously she was department administrator in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Since 2014, Polidora has also been a Tufts Threat Assessment and Management (TTAM) team member, providing her practical understanding of the student experience and specific knowledge of the issues and challenges faced by the students in the School of Engineering. As manager of CLIC, she will oversee the transition and development of systems for managing the space, act as point person for the “de-bugging” of building systems and be responsible for assessing and standardizing policies within the new 95,000-square-foot complex.

Todd Quinto, the Robinson Professor of Mathematics, gave a plenary talk at the International Conference on Sensing and Imaging 2015 in Chifeng, China. He also gave a colloquium talk at the Tata Institute for Fundamental Research’s Centre for Applicable Mathematics in Bangalore, India, and worked there on the math behind radar and ultrasound with his former postdoc Venkateswaran Krishnan.

Deborah J. Schildkraut, professor and chair of political science, provided media commentary about U.S. immigration, particularly as it relates to the popularity of Donald Trump. Her comments appeared in Bloomberg View, the New York Times and Vox.

Saul Tzipori, Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Infectious Disease and the Agnes Varis Chair at Cummings School, traveled to Putrajaya, Malaysia, to represent the Tufts One Health Workforce team at the South East Asia One Health University Network executive board meeting in early July, and then traveled to Kigali, Rwanda, for the One Health Central and Eastern Africa executive board meeting.

Rachel Weinstock, A15, is among the 55 individuals selected for a Princeton in Latin America (PiLA) Fellowship for 2015-16. PiLA is an independent nonprofit that offers yearlong post-undergraduate social justice service placements with its nonprofit and NGO partners in Latin America and the Caribbean. Weinstock will be working with the organization Liceo Científico Dr. Miguel Canela Lázaro in the Dominican Republic.

Giovanni Widmer, a professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at Cummings School, gave a talk on “Analysis of Complex Bacterial Populations Using 16S Amplicon Sequencing” at a symposium on The Microbiome: Health and Disease at the Biomedical Primate Research Centre in Rijkswijk, Holland, on June 11.

Timothy A. Wise, G05, research and policy program director at Tufts’ Global Development and Environment Institute (GDAE), will co-coordinate a working group on biodiversity and climate change at a conference in Mexico titled “The Peasant Economy and Agro-Ecology in the Americas.” In addition, the Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst has named Wise a senior research fellow in its Program on Development, Peacebuilding and the Environment. Wise will develop work at PERI on agricultural development, trade and the right to food. Starting Oct. 1, he will split his time between PERI and GDAE, though he will not be in residence at PERI.