Tufts in the News

Publication date: Monday, January 22, 2018
National Public Radio
"For basic healthy living, it's not about your genes, it's about your behavior," says Friedman's Dariush Mozaffarianon on NPR's Morning Edition program.
Publication date: Friday, January 19, 2018
National Public Radio
This is a review of World Peace Foundation Director Alex de Waal's book, "Mass Starvation: The History and Future of Famine."
Publication date: Friday, January 19, 2018
Boston Globe
Political scientist Jeffrey Berry comments on Sen. Elizabeth Warren's 2018 reelection bid and questions surrounding her heritage.
Publication date: Friday, January 19, 2018
BBC News
Computer scientist Kathleen Fisher is quoted on the vulnerabilities of high-tech cars.
Publication date: Friday, January 19, 2018
The Conversation
Political scientist Jeffrey Berry writes about the impact that the Clinton Foundation and its controversies have had on the legacy of President Bill Clinton.
Publication date: Thursday, January 18, 2018
New York Times
CIRCLE Director Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg's work explored how young men and women differed in their voting choices in the 2016 presidential election.
Publication date: Thursday, January 18, 2018
Fox News Radio
James Stavridis, dean of The Fletcher School, appears on this radio program to discuss President Donald Trump's threats toward North Korea and current policy strategy in Iran.
Publication date: Thursday, January 18, 2018
Time
This article includes data from a CIRCLE analysis of exit polls from recent elections in Virginia.
Publication date: Wednesday, January 17, 2018
NBC News
"What we have done is discourage our allies, who have always looked up to the U.S. Navy in the post-World War II era as the competent professionals in the Pacific," says James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School of a recent naval incident in the Pacific Ocean.
Publication date: Wednesday, January 17, 2018
WBUR-FM
An interview with TUSM’s Dominique Michaud on her epidemiological study which found that individuals with gum disease had a higher risk of developing cancer compared to those with no or mild gum disease; the association was strongest for lung and colorectal cancer.

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